06/29/2011

Michael

Kenney

Michael Kenney

Associate Professor
Curriculum vitae

Education

  • PhD, Political Science , University of Florida, 2002
  • MA, Latin American Studies, University of Florida, 1996
  • BA, Political Science and Philosophy, University of Massachusetts, 1990

Bio

Michael Kenney (Ph.D., Florida) is associate professor of international affairs at the University of Pittsburgh. He is the author of From Pablo to Osama: Trafficking and Terrorist Networks, Government Bureaucracies, and Competitive Adaptation and the co-editor of Organizational Learning in the Global Context. Dr. Kenney has published numerous articles on terrorism, counter-terrorism, and drug trafficking in Survival, Terrorism and Political Violence, Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, Global Crime, the International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence, and the Wall Street Journal, among other publications.  He has conducted field research in Brazil, Britain, Colombia, Israel, Morocco, and Spain. Dr. Kenney has held research fellowships at Stanford University and the University of Southern California.  He has received research grants from the National Institute of Justice (PI: “Organizational Learning and Islamic Militancy”), the Office of Naval Research (co-PI: “Competitive Adaptation and Terrorist Networks”), the National Science Foundation, and other institutions.  His current research, involving substantial field work and supported by the Office of Naval Research, focuses al-Muhajiroun, a banned Islamist group based in the United Kingdom. Dr. Kenney teaches courses in terrorism, counter-terrorism and homeland security, drug control policy, international relations, foreign policy, and Latin American politics.  Prior to earning his doctorate in political science, he was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Ecuador, South America, and an Americorps Volunteer at the Center for Drug-Free Living in Orlando, Florida

Teaching and Research Areas

Terrorism, counter-terrorism and homeland security, drug control policy, international relations, U.S. foreign policy, Latin American politics

Select Publications and Funded Research

  • “Organizational Adaptation in an Activist Network: Social Networks, Leadership, and Change in al-Muhajiroun,”(co-authored with John Horgan, Cale Horne, Peter Vining, Kathleen Carley, Michael Bigrigg, Mia Bloom, and Kurt Braddock), Applied Ergonomics for special issue, “Detecting Terrorist Networks.” (2012, in press): pp. 1-9, doi:10.1016/j.apergo.2012.05.005
  • “The Evolution of the International Drugs Trade: The Case of Colombia, 1930-2000,” in Routledge Handbook of Transnational Organized Crime, edited by Felia Allum and Stan Gilmour (London: Routledge, 2012), pp. 201-216.
  • “Hotbed of Radicalization or Something Else?: An Ethnographic Exploration of a Muslim Neighborhood in Ceuta,” Terrorism and Political Violence 23, no. 4 (Fall 2011): 537-559.
  • “‘Dumb’ yet Deadly: Local Knowledge and Poor Tradecraft among Islamist Militants in Britain and Spain,” Studies in Conflict and Terrorism 33, no. 10 (October 2010): 911-932.
  • “Beyond the Internet: MÄ“tis, Techne, and the Limitations of Online Artifacts for Islamist Terrorists,” Terrorism and Political Violence 22, no. 2 (April 2010): 177-197.
  • “Organizational Learning and Islamic Militancy,” NIJ Journal, no. 265 (April 2010): 18-21.
  • “Turning to the “Dark Side”: Coordination, Exchange, and Learning in Criminal Networks,” in Networked Politics: Agency, Power, and Governance, edited by Miles Kahler (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2009): 79-102.
  • From Pablo to Osama: Trafficking and Terrorist Networks, Government Bureaucracies, and Competitive Adaptation (University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2007).
  • Organizational Learning in the Global Context, co-edited with M. Leann Brown and Michael Zarkin (London: Ashgate, 2006).
  • Office of Naval Research, “Competitive Adaptation in Terrorist Networks,” 2009-2012, co-PI on $3.1 million dollar research grant dealing with terrorism and homeland security issues, Office of Naval Research    (ONR), U.S. Department of the Navy, No. N00014-09-1-0667.
  • National Institute of Justice, Social Science Research on Terrorism, PI on $148,862 grant, “Organizational Learning and Islamic Militancy, January 2007-September 2008.

Courses

  • Terrorism (PIA 2327)
  • Drug Policy in Comparative Perspective (PIA 2429)
  • Capstone Seminar on Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism (PIA 2096-18)

Other Faculty and Academic Administration Positions

  • Associate Professor of Political Science and Public Policy, Pennsylvania State University, Capital College, School of Public Affairs, July 2009-June 2011.
  • Assistant Professor of Political Science and Public Policy, Pennsylvania State University, Capital College, School of Public Affairs, August 2003-June 2009.
  • Homeland Security Post-Doctoral Scholar, Stanford Institute for International Studies, Stanford University, September 2004-December 2004.
  • Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Center for International Studies, University of Southern California, 2002-2003.
  • Hamburg (Predoctoral) Fellow, Center for International Security and Cooperation, Stanford University, 2000-2001.
     

Graduate School of Public and International Affairs
3601 Wesley W. Posvar Hall, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260