Faculty Directory

Dennis Gormley Participates in International Discussions on Missile Proliferation

09/03/2010

09/03/2010

Professor Gormley has recently participated in several international conferences that help shape the debate on important international security questions. Two preoccupy Gormley’s current attention: controlling missile proliferation and achieving deep reductions in nuclear weapons.

In late August, Professor Gormley presented a paper at a conference in Canberra, Australia on "Nuclear Disarmament: Pipe Dream or Policy Objective?" The conference was sponsored by the Strategic and Defense Studies Center of the Australian National University's College of Asia and the Pacific.  The paper focused on ways to allay concerns about U.S. conventional superiority in order to achieve deeper reductions in global nuclear arsenals.

In March, he was invited by the European Union to participate in an Experts Meeting in Vienna, Austria on the 130-nation Hague Code of Conduct against Ballistic Missile Proliferation.  In January, he was a principal lecturer at the 23rd International School of Disarmament and Research on Conflicts on "The Road to Nuclear Zero and Arms Control," in Trento, Italy. Two GSPIA students, Kevin Uitvlugt and Joseph Liddle, attended this event with generous support provided by GSPIA and the Ridgway Center. Professor Gormley then gave a talk  in late January on "Asia and Arms Control" at a conference sponsored by the Carnegie Endowment, the Non-Proliferation Policy Education Center, and the Naval War College, in Washington, D.C. And in November 2009, he was invited by the U.S. Department of State to speak at a Proliferation Awareness Training Workshop in Aqaba, Jordan.

These international conferences and workshops play a critical role by stimulating discussion and furthering debate about critical international security issues.  Professor. Gormley explains, “These fora provoke discussion and debate about topics with important ethical, political, and security implications. They allow academics and non-governmental specialists to stimulate thinking within and outside government circles about emerging and existing policy challenges.” Government representatives are regular attendees at such conferences and routinely benefit from such “track two,” unofficial deliberations. 

Professor Gormley is also a well-respected voice in these policy debates due his many publications. His article "Winning on Ballistic Missiles But Losing on Cruise: The Missile Proliferation Battle" was published in December 2009 issue of Arms Control Today. He also wrote a chapter for an edited book—Getting to Zero—that will address the challenges of achieving nuclear abolition and which was accepted for publication by Stanford University Press in the winter of 2010.  Professor Gormley also joined with Colin Clarke, one of GSPIA’s PhD students, in co-authoring a chapter on the destabilizing role of missiles for an edited book, Arms Control and Proliferation in the Middle East: Overcoming the Security Dilemma, which will be published by Routledge in December 2010. The book culminates a two-year study led by the Peace Research Institute of Frankfurt, consisting of academics from Europe,  America, and the Middle East, searching for ways to make arms control breakthroughs in the Middle East.

Professor Gormley served in the Intelligence Community for 10 years before joining Pacific-Sierra Research, where he worked for two decades, including as a senior vice president and head the company’s east coast operations, while also serving on its board of directors. He has chaired or served on many Department of Defense and intelligence advisory panels and frequently testified before Senate and House committees of Congress. He has also been a consultant to the RAND Corporation and Sandia National Laboratories, among many others, and been affiliated with several major think tanks, including the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London and the Monterey Institute’s James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies in Washington, D.C.

Gormley received a B.A. and M.A. in history from the University of Connecticut in 1965 and 1966 and attended Officer Candidate School at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland, where he was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Army Ordnance Corps, serving on active duty from 1966 to 1969.

He is the author of three books, including Missile Contagion: Cruise Missile Proliferation and the Threat to International Security (Praeger, 2008), Dealing with the Threat of Cruise Missiles (Oxford University Press, 2001), and Double Zero and Soviet Military Strategy: Implications for Western Security (Jane’s, 1988). A paperback edition of his latest book Missile Contagion, is being published by the U.S. Naval Institute Press and is scheduled for release in mid-September.

Gormley has contributed extensively to edited books and newspapers, while his journal articles have appeared in Survival, the Washington Quarterly, Arms Control Today, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Nonproliferation Review, Orbis, and many others.  At GSPIA Professor Gormley currently teaches courses on Intelligence Support to Policymaking: The Impact of 9/11 in the fall and  Analyzing Critical International Security Challenges: Three Weekend Workshops in the spring. 

(Gormley is a Senior Lecturer on the GSPIA faculty and a Senior Research Fellow at the Ridgway Center for International Security Studies. His research areas of expertise include intelligence, military strategy and transformation, missile proliferation, missile defense, arms control and nonproliferation policy.)
 


 

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